A Type of Cancer That Begins in the Uterus

Uterine cancer is cancer that starts in the uterus. The uterus is a female reproductive organ, also called the womb, where a baby develops during pregnancy. One of the most common types of uterine cancer is endometrial cancer, which is cancer in the lining of uterus. Uterine sarcoma is another, rarer, type of uterine cancer. 

Uterine cancer can often be treated effectively when it is discovered early. It is important to talk to your doctor if you have any unusual vaginal discharge or bleeding, or pain in your pelvis.

Treatment

Your treatment plan will depend on the type of uterine cancer you have, how far it has spread and your personal and family medical history. Treatments may include surgery, chemotherapy, radiation or hormone therapy.

Surgery is often used to treat uterine cancer. At Penn State Cancer Institute, our urologic team includes three fellowship-trained surgeons. They have extensive surgical experience for all urological cancers, including uterine cancer. Our highly skilled team delivers the latest advances in care: 

  • Minimally invasive surgical procedures (robotic surgery)
  • Standard, open surgery
  • Salvage surgeries following radiation
  • Surgery to address locally advanced cancer

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Uterine cancer is cancer that starts in the uterus. The uterus is a female reproductive organ, also called the womb, where a baby develops during pregnancy.

Symptoms

The most common symptoms of uterine cancer are unusual bleeding and discharge. Symptoms of uterine sarcoma may also include: 

  • Frequent urination
  • A mass in the vagina
  • Pain in your belly or pelvis
  • Frequent urination

If you experience any of these symptoms, or have other concerns, schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately.

Diagnosis

  • Your provider will give you a complete exam find out what’s causing your symptoms. The appointment will include a pelvic exam so your doctor can check for any abnormalities. 
  • Additional tests may also be ordered, including a transvaginal ultrasound and possibly a biopsy. 
  • The ultrasound will help your doctor see any unusual growths or areas in your uterus. If there are suspicious spots on the ultrasound, then you may need a biopsy. 
  • During the biopsy, a small sample of cells will be collected and then tested for cancer. Your doctor will use this information to create a treatment plan that is right for you. 

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